Gravity that Binds

 
 


Untitled Photogram, 2021
From; Creators of the Black Star

      
Originally postulated in 1984[3] to be orbiting the Sun at a distance of about 95,000 AU (1.5 light-years),Nemesis somewhat beyond the Oort cloud, to explain a perceived cycle of mass extinctions in the geological record, which seem to occur more often at intervals of 26 million years. The majority of solar-type stars are single.[7] The previous idea stated half or perhaps most stellar systems were binary, triple, or multiple-star systems associated with clusters of stars, rather than the single-star systems that tend to be seen most often. 

The previous idea stated half or perhaps most stellar systems were binary, triple, or multiple-star systems associated with clusters of stars, rather than the single-star systems that tend to be seen most often.[citation needed] In a 2017 paper, Sarah Sadavoy and Steven Stahler argued that the Sun was likely part of a binary system at the time of its formation, leading them to suggest "there probably was a Nemesis, a long time ago".[8][9] Such a star would have separated from this binary system over four billion years ago, meaning it could not be responsible for the more recent perceived cycle of mass extinctions



Evgeniy’s current work is an exploration in “visual thinking”. Following in the footsteps of French physician and parapsychologist, Dr. Hippolyte Baraduc, who in the late XVIII - early XlX century attempted to take photographs of thoughts and emotions, Yev’s work contemplates whether the fragility and temporality of the image-making process can bring us closer to elements of the realm of the invisible world. 

Light-reactive photograms are embodied, purely analogue, in nature. The physical apparition of astral forms in the red light and mephitic waters of the darkroom chemicals, is acompelling and dramatic process in its ephemerality. The mystery of the  process draws and guides the artist in his creative experiments, touching the ineffable cosmic soup, inspired by the unknown.





Mark